Learn to Track Flowers for Bats

The ​lesser ​long-nosed ​bat ​travels ​north ​from ​Mexico ​each ​year ​to ​summer ​in ​Southern ​Arizona ​while ​raising ​its ​young. ​The ​bats ​rely ​on ​nectar, ​pollen, ​and ​fruits ​from ​local ​cactus ​and ​succulents. ​The ​US ​Fish ​& ​Wildlife ​Service ​and ​the ​USA ​National ​Phenology ​Network ​seek ​to ​understand ​whether ​the ​flowering ​time ​of ​these ​species ​is ​changing.   You ​can ​help by tracking ​the ​flowering ​of ​saguaro ​and ​other ​plants ​in ​your ​yard ​or ​by ​adopting ​a ​trail ​in ​the ​Tucson ​area. ​ Learn how to get involved with this training at the Gardens!

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Details

Training ​Description: 
We ​will ​spend ​a ​half ​hour ​inside ​going ​over ​the ​Flowers ​for ​Bats ​program ​and ​how ​it ​helps ​the ​lesser ​long-nosed ​bat. ​We ​will ​spend ​one ​hour ​outside ​in ​the ​Gardens ​learning ​to ​identify ​agaves, ​making ​observations ​of ​saguaros, ​and ​learning ​how ​to ​use ​the ​Nature’s ​Notebook ​mobile ​apps ​and ​paper ​datasheets. ​We ​will ​spend ​the ​final ​half ​hour ​back ​inside ​learning ​how ​to ​set ​up ​sites ​online, ​add ​plants, ​and ​enter ​paper ​datasheets ​online. ​

Training ​Objectives: 
1. ​Understand ​what ​Flowers ​for ​Bats ​is ​and ​why ​it ​helps ​the ​lesser ​long-nosed ​bat.
2. ​Practice ​how ​to ​make ​phenology ​observations ​with ​Nature’s ​Notebook.
3. ​Understand ​the ​differences ​in ​how ​to ​observe ​saguaros ​and ​agaves.
4. ​Practice ​how ​to ​create ​an ​observation ​site ​in ​Nature’s ​Notebook, ​add ​plants, ​and ​enter ​data. ​

Registration includes admission to the Gardens which is open until 8 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays.

Date: 04/19/2019

Time: 4 to 6 p.m.

Price: $15

Class availability limitations: Full

Instructor

National Phenology Network

National Phenology Network

The USA National Phenology Network supports science, natural resource management, and communication by providing data, tools, and resources and by connecting people.

www.usanpn.org

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